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Next live show: ETHEL
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Next live show: ETHEL

More or less the house band of the Metropolitan Museum, this quartet is remarkable for the variety of its collaborators, the ingenuity of the music it commissions, and the level of its musicianship. All 4 Ethelians will play, and 2, artistic directors Dorothy Lawson (cello) and Ralph Farris (viola), will talk. They’ll be joined by … Continue reading »

Politics and Policy / Science & Medicine

Episode 237: Blanche Pitt

  ICAP at Columbia University sees its international public health work as part of broad commitment to social justice. Nobody personifies those values more than Blanche Pitt, who directs ICAP’s projects in South Africa. With music from Kevin Nathaniel Hylton.  Person: Mark Heywood  Place:: Joseph Stone Auditorium  Thing: South African Constitution  Randy’s People: Gilbert & … Continue reading »

Art

Episode 234: Samuel Levi Jones

  He rips the covers from encyclopedias and law books – the texts of power – and stitches them together into artwork that is moving and beautiful. “Some individuals have found it problematic that I’m destroying this material.” Destroying or reconfiguring? A conversation about art and authority at the International Print Center New York, with … Continue reading »

Music

Episode 231: Sam Reider

  This accordion virtuoso has brought American roots music across the globe. He sees the accordion as a symbol of immigrant triumph – Zydeco! Tex-Mex! – and as the instrument of 19th century colonialism. Paradox and polkas. And no darn Lawrence Welk.  PERSON: David Amram  PLACE:a synagogue in Azerbaijan  THING:his accordion  RANDY’S THING: The Impossible … Continue reading »

Movies / Theater

Episode 229: Todd Solondz

   Is Julie Chen’s defense of her husband, Les Moonves, pathetic stand-by-your-manism or admirable personal loyalty? A surprising analysis from the creator of the darkly comic films “Welcome to the Dollhouse” and “Happiness.” This fall he makes his playwriting and stage directing debut with “Emma and Max,” described as “a satire of tragic dimensions,” at … Continue reading »